Author: Monique Becenti Page 1 of 3

How You Should Respond Internally to IT Security Incidents

In a single day, websites experience, on average, nearly 60 cyberattacks. And for small businesses, successful attacks can have a lasting impact: 60% of small businesses will go out of business following a successful breach due to the costs of recovery.

In this article, we’ll talk about IT security incidents, which are events that indicate an organization’s systems or data have been compromised or that existing cybersecurity measures have failed. The key to staying afloat during an IT security incident is preparation — and effective communication is a major component in that. Knowing how to communicate transparently, both internally and externally, in the wake of an attack not only builds trust with your employees but also helps protect your reputation.

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Mitigation Strategies for Cyber Attacks at Your Small Business

If you’re wondering how to protect your small business against a cyber attack, you’re not alone. Almost 60% of cyber attack victims are small businesses, and within two years of the first attack, the likelihood that a small business will experience another is approximately 28%

In response, entrepreneurs everywhere are looking for a mitigation strategy that limits any potential damage while meeting their business needs. Even if you implement preventive security measures, such as keeping your website software up-to-date, perfect cybersecurity is never a guarantee, especially as hackers become more persistent and use more sophisticated methods.

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Types of Cybersecurity Threats Your Incident Response Plan Should Include

Cybersecurity threats aren’t going away anytime soon. In fact, our annual security report illustrates that the number of daily website attack attempts increased by 59% between January 2018 and December 2018. This increase shows that cybercriminals are not only deploying attacks more often, but also using automation technology to do so. 

The good news? These attempts appear to be getting less successful. Of the 6 million individual websites that we analyzed, only 60,000 were actually compromised following an attack attempt, indicating that website security tools are getting better at fending off attacks.

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What is an Incident Response Plan — and Why Does Your Small Business Need One?

Responding to a cyberattack can be confusing, complicated, overwhelming, and often all-consuming. In the wake of an attack, many small businesses don’t know what to do first or how to avoid making the situation worse. Creating a well-thought-out plan in advance, however, can make incident response in cybersecurity both easier and more effective. In fact, every small business should have a cyber incident response plan in place to help mitigate damage in the wake of a cyberattack.

An incident response plan should outline how a business will detect an attack, what needs to happen to limit the consequences, and ultimately how to remove the threat. At each point, the plan should identify who’s responsible for which activity, which tools to use, and how to coordinate both internal and external communications.

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The Financial Impact of Cyberattacks is Greater Than You Think

Here’s a common scenario: You receive a notification saying your small business website has been hit with a cyberattack. Suddenly, the web host has suspended your site, and you’ve been blacklisted from major search engines because your site poses a risk to visitors. Essentially, your website turns invisible.

Amid the chaos, you need to understand and fix the problem. Many small businesses rely on contracted web developers, who, in turn, rely on someone else for cybersecurity. The security provider needs to get involved immediately because the longer the problem persists, the worse the damage becomes.

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Cybersecurity Year in Review and Our Predictions Moving Forward

Our most recent cybersecurity research is now available in the “Cybersecurity Trends in 2019: Protecting Websites in the Age of Stealth Attacks” report. In it, we identified the trends, threats, and innovations in cybercrime that small businesses need to know about in order to keep their websites secure. We also look to the future, taking a good hard look at what last year’s lessons will mean moving forward.

To compile this cybersecurity industry report, we analyzed 6 million individual websites using an algorithm our team developed to evaluate website vulnerability. The goal was to identify attack patterns and risk factors based on the types of vulnerabilities present in websites and the types of attacks today’s hackers deploy. The result is a comprehensive report that offers website administrators important insights into online security.

The Biggest Cybersecurity Trends of 2018

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Don’t Get Suckered Into the Optimism Bias When It Comes to Website Security

If we concentrate hard enough, most of us can leave our personal biases out of our critical thinking. However, we’re not always consciously aware of the most persistent bias of them all: optimism. The optimism bias is the unfounded belief that we’re more likely to experience positive results than negative ones, even when tangible evidence suggests otherwise.

How does this relate to website cybersecurity?

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Tips to Stop Cybersecurity Threats for Small Businesses

It’s no secret that small to midsize businesses usually have similarly small budgets. As a result, expenses that don’t outwardly contribute to sales growth — like cybersecurity — often fall by the wayside. But small business cyberattack examples abound, defying the misconception that SMBs are safe from cyberthreats.

Misconceptions About Cybersecurity Threats for Small Businesses

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How to Prevent Malware as a Small Business

What is malware? It’s a rather simple question, but to answer it, we have to go back in time.

The first real instance of malware occurred in the early 1970s — when BBN Technologies engineer Bob Thomas wrote the code behind the so-called “Creeper worm.” The worm was the first self-replicating computer program, and it quickly spread through the ARPANET, annoying users with the pop-up message: “I’m the creeper: Catch me if you can.” Over time, engineers took the Creeper worm’s principles further, leading to the creation of the first viruses.

A decade after the Creeper worm, computer scientist Fred Cohen defined a virus as “a program that can infect other programs by modifying them to include a, possibly evolved, version of itself.” The definition remains accurate today, but now, it applies to an array of programs that have been created for nefarious purposes.

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How to Protect Your Website From DDoS

Since the arrival of the new millennium, cybercriminals have used distributed denial of service attacks to shut down some of the world’s biggest websites. You may have heard the acronym DDoS before, but what is a DDoS attack? And how can one impact your website?

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