Author: Lauren Papagalos Page 7 of 26

WordCamp NYC 2016 – The Empire State of WordPress

WordCamp New York City departed from the norm this year by hosting not at an academic facility, but at the prestigious United Nations Headquarters in Manhattan. Seated on the East River, the United Nations Headquarters boasted impressive art pieces and beefy airport-like security. WordCamp NYC took part in the UN’s Unite Open Source initiative which aims to “break down barriers to technology innovation through open source governance, communities and collaboration.” #WCNYC hosted their two tracks in two huge auditoriums, equipped with state-of-the-art audio/video equipment, including individual microphones for each seat.

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Ask a Security Professional: Malware Analysis Series — Part Three: How is a Signature Born?

Security researchers at security firms like SiteLock® audit code that has been flagged as suspicious, either by individuals or by an automated system performing behavioral analysis (which we’ll talk more about in the next section), to determine whether or not the code is actually malicious. If a file or piece of code is deemed malicious by the security researcher, it enters the database, typically as either a file match signature, or a code snippet signature.

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WordCamp Orange County 2016 – To Infinity and Beyond

Starship WordCamp Orange County began its 48-hour voyage to boldly go where no WordCamp has gone before on July 9. The space-themed #WCOC was hosted in the Applied Innovation compound of the University of California’s Irvine campus. The event took place upstairs in an area called “The Cove,” which also contains what appeared to be various upstart companies’ offices as well as an impressive array of big-screen displays in most conference rooms. There were four tracks to host the talks, which were also themed in title, The Nebula, The Comet, The Dwarf Star and The Asteroid Field.

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Ask a Security Professional: Malware Analysis Series — Part Two: Behavioral Analysis

You could consider signature-based analysis to be like a policeman running the plates of every car in a parking lot against the police department’s database of stolen vehicles. While this may be an effective method for finding stolen vehicles, if the license plate on the car has been changed or obscured, the car will most likely be overlooked. Keeping with this analogy, behavioral analysis would be the detective.

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Hackers Compromise Website

How Hackers Compromise Your Website

Cybercriminals are unpredictable. They’ll surprise you by sneaking into your website, executing attacks and harming your data and business. You can think of it like a baseball game in which the hacker is trying to make it to the next base without getting called out. Secure all your bases by learning a little about how hackers attack your website.

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Ask a Security Professional: Malware Analysis Series — Part One: Signature-Based Analysis

Back in February, a colleague and I delivered a talk on website security at WordCamp Miami. Among the many great questions we received both during the talk’s Q&A and at our sponsor booth, one common theme kept reoccurring from attendees: How does malware detection really work?

If you want to check out our WordCamp Miami talk, “Beyond the Basics: Building Security into Your Development Projects,” and the corresponding slides are available online.

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SiteLock Website Security

Celebrating our Freedom to a Safe and Accessible Internet

We celebrate Independence Day to honor the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. As Americans, we have the right to freedom of religion, speech, press, and the Internet.

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Let Freedom Ring…

…for all WordPressers!

The Cost of a data breach

Calculating the Cost of a Data Breach [Infographic]

The cost of a data breach is rising globally. Learn how different countries and industries are impacted when they’re hit with one.

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Data breaches

Cybercriminals are Oversharing with Social Media Data Breaches

It’s been a busy time for data breaches in the social media world with Myspace, LinkedIn and Twitter all experiencing them. In each of these cases, the cybercriminals behind the breaches were after usernames and passwords. The most commonly used passwords today are, “password” and “123456,” and it only takes a hacker .29 milliseconds to crack them.

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