Author: Lauren Papagalos Page 12 of 17

content delivery network

Increase Website Speed with a CDN

We all want faster websites, no matter which side of the site we’re sitting on. Surfers want faster page loading times because they’re usually impatient and will quickly lose interest if the page appears to take more than a millisecond to load. And as a business owner, you should be concerned with speed too. You don’t want to lose valuable customers just because your website appears to be tranquilized.

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Protecting Customer Data

Customer DataIdentity theft is the number one crime in America, a crime that claims an average of more than a million new victims every 30 days. And many of those victims are as a result of businesses that leak their customer information, usually by accident, and often through their website.

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SiteLock Website Security

Hacked.gif: The Hidden Dangers of Malware in Website Images

For your company’s brand, sometimes image is everything. And how better to establish the your brand’s image than through the images on your website? The images you use on your website and social media accounts have to be chosen carefully.

You need to choose images that support the content you’re publishing and the message you’re promoting. You need to choose images that are appropriate for your audiences because you don’t want to offend anyone. And of course you need to choose images that you have permission to use. Using unlicensed images can cost you thousands of dollars in fines, even if they were put on your website years ago by a third-party web designer.

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POS Malware

Big Brands Defenseless Against POS Malware

2014 could go down as one of the most significant years in the world of cybersecurity, and malware in particular. It wasn’t just the small window that revealed data breaches at Target, Neiman Marcus, Michaels Craft Stores and potentially dozens of other retailers. Nor was it the fact that this explosion in data breaches could all be the work of a seventeen-year-old.

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Was 2013’s Target Security Breach Really Just The Work Of A Teenager?

grounded_for_lifeWhat’s worse than being recognized as the biggest data breach in history? How about finding out that the culprit responsible for a major hit on your brand and reputation that will eventually cost you billions of dollars was a teenager?

That’s exactly the news Target is dealing with, as security researchers suggest that at least one of the hackers behind the malware used to attack Target is barely 17 years old. Yet this teen was apparently able to develop a pretty sophisticated piece of malware, known as BlackPoS, that was used to infiltrate Target’s systems undetected. And in spite of his young age he’s reported to have already earned a reputation for developing lots of advanced malware. It’s not believed that the teenager is personally responsible for the attacks on Target, but instead sold his malware to dozens and possibly even hundreds of hackers and criminal groups. And one of those groups was behind the Target breach.

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Celebrate Data Privacy Day with SiteLock

dpd_logoWith the Target data breach and its endless repercussions still on most people’s minds, next week’s Data Privacy Day (January 28th) is well-timed to pause and think about data privacy and what it means to your business and customers.

The idea behind Data Privacy Day has been around for a number of years, but began to really catch on in 2009 with the U.S. Congress declared the very first National Data Privacy Day. So every year around this time, privacy and security advocates use this annual event to raise consumer and business awareness about privacy, what it does and should mean to us, and why it’s so important for all of us to recognize.

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POS Malware Hits Target in Data Breach

Data breachIt’s been less than a month since mega retailer Target announced that a little more than 40 million customer debit and credit cards had been stolen by hackers. Not long after that, we saw the first of those cards being sold a few hundred thousand at a time, in a variety of underground hacker forums. Although not that underground, since I was able to register on the most notorious hacker sites and see for myself how easy it was to buy an identity.

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What Your PC Can Teach You About Website Security

Website securityConfused about how to protect your website? It’s actually not that hard (hint: there are great companies that will do it all for you for less than a buck a day). But perhaps the easiest way to get your head around website security is to think of it like a PC. Except this is the most important PC you could ever have, because much if not most of your business probably relies on it.

Think about all the things you need to do to protect your PC, and how easy it is. For example:

  • You protect it from malware by making sure you have good quality antivirus software. You constantly update that software so it can detect the latest threats, and you regularly scan your computer in case anything slipped past.
  • You use a firewall, so that you can deny access to hackers and malware that constantly stalk the internet looking for vulnerable computers like yours.
  • You practice computer hygiene. You’re careful about what websites you visit and what you download, so that you don’t inadvertently infect your computer.
  • You make sure your PC is constantly patched. Most malware infections result from unpatched vulnerabilities, from Windows to Flash, so you want to patch those vulnerabilities before a hacker can exploit them.
  • If other people have access to your PC, you let them know what the rules are, so that they don’t do something that breaches your good security habits.
  • If there’s sensitive information on your PC, you take a variety of precautions to protect it. You use strong passwords that are hard to guess, you change those passwords frequently, and you guard them well. And you encrypt any sensitive information on that PC so that if hackers make it past your first lines of defense, your crown jewels are still safe.
  • And you take a bunch of precautions, from backing up your data to regular maintenance, to make sure that your PC is always available to you.

The principles of protecting your website are not much different. Granted, putting them into practice can be a little more challenging, which is why you have companies like SiteLock to do it automatically and comprehensively.

But back to those principles. If you’re serious about protecting your website, think about it like you would any PC or laptop:

  • Protect it from malware that can infect your website, steal data, and spread to your customers.
  • Protect sensitive data, especially customer and credit card data, with layers of security that should include encryption.
  • Use strong passwords, especially for web access and FTP, that are changed often and protected well.
  • Teach all employees about your website security rules so that whenever they have access to your site, they use it responsibly.
  • And regularly review and update your security so that it can match the latest threats, meets any regulatory requirements (like PCI), and does not end up being blacklisted by search engines.

Protecting your website can be challenging, but we can make it easy. Call SiteLock at 855.378.6200 to learn how to automate website security.

 

Cybercrime Year in Review: 2013

cybercrimeOh, what a year it was for insecurity, and especially for the small business. It wasn’t as though we didn’t already know – that small businesses were firmly in the crosshairs of hackers. But early in the year Verizon put the final stamp on it. In its annual Data Breach Investigations Report, published at the beginning of 2013, Verizon revealed that businesses with fewer than 100 employees made up the single largest group of victims of data breaches. That conclusion was supported by other security studies around the same time that found small businesses suffered the most cyber attacks.

Perhaps the single biggest and most dangerous change in threats came in the world of malware delivery. For years, hackers and malware authors had used the same ways to deliver and spread their malware. Email and spam were by far the most popular. It was easy to buy hundreds of millions of email addresses, pack them with phishing messages, and attach a nasty malware payload.

And even if most users didn’t fall for the scam, even a small percentage of hundreds of millions was enough to make the attacks very lucrative for criminals. But as more users got the message, and began to grow more reluctant to open email attachments they weren’t expecting, many thought the malware industry was on its last legs. After all, how else could you get the goods to market?

So hackers had to choose a new way to deliver and spread malware. And they found it in small business websites. Every month, thousands of poorly protected websites are hijacked by hackers who use vulnerabilities in these sites to install malware. That malware is then spread to visitors to those websites, as well as attack other websites, and so continue the spread of malware.

And if you think that simply relying on antivirus software will get you through safely, there’s some more bad news. Some reports have suggested that today’s antivirus software can detect very few of the most dangerous types of malware – the stuff you really want to avoid. And the New York Times can testify to that. Early in 2013, Chinese hackers were easily able to breach the extensive defenses the Times had in place. Out of 45 different types of malware the Chinese used to attack the newspaper, the Times’ own security and virus protection detected only one.

But Chinese hackers weren’t just targeting big businesses like the New York Times. In September, the Huffington Post reported that Chinese hackers were actively targeting small businesses in the U.S., from pizza restaurants to medical clinics.

According to the Huffington Post, “The hackers find computer systems to take over by using tools that scan the web for Internet-connected PCs with software vulnerabilities they can exploit. Small businesses are popular targets because they often have lax security.”

And the year didn’t end too well either. When security researchers discovered more than 2 million stolen passwords on a hacker server in December, a piece of malware called a keylogger was suspected. That very same week, other security researchers found that out of 44 popular antivirus products tested, only one was able to detect a keylogger.

Which probably explains why an estimated $5 billion was siphoned from U.S. bank accounts in 2012 by cybercrooks using malware like keyloggers. And if any of those were business accounts, the business owners were probably on the hook for all the losses.

So safe to say (no pun intended) that 2013 was not a good year for business security, and especially for small business security. And we don’t predict much improvement over the next twelve months. It’s now clear that small businesses are the favorite target for the worst kinds of hackers. Whether it’s to steal your personal and customer information, break into your bank account, or use your website to host a variety of very dangerous malware, your small business may be getting all the wrong attention from all the wrong visitors.

So let’s make 2014 the year you take back your security and peace of mind. Security isn’t hard, no matter how sophisticated hackers and their tools have become. There are plenty of ways you can protect your business and your website, and make it just hard enough for hackers to decide that you’re just not worth the effort and that they should move on to small businesses that are doing little about security. It’s like locking your car and closing the windows while being parked next to a convertible with the top down. The easy target gets attacked first, and you’re at least lower on the radar by showing your security awareness.

If you make just one security choice this year, make it your website. Securing your website is simple and affordable, and yet it’s the single best way to protect your business, your customers, and any visitors to your site. And you’ll also help slow the spread of malware to other users and sites, which is one in the eye for the bad guys.

And remember that as a SiteLock customer you get more than prevention. SiteLock will work with you to address any website security issues that crop up, including malware removal, if any is detected on your site. And as always, our security advice – the best in the business – is always free, and we are here around the clock whenever you need support.

If you’re a frequent reader of this blog, then you’ll know that our expertise and advice goes far beyond just protecting your website. All good security has to be holistic, which is why we offer no-nonsense advice on a variety of security topics that can impact your business, from security policies and planning, to employee education, malware prevention, data privacy and security, and much more.

Our goal for 2014 is to be the best security partner for online businesses. We hope that, even if SiteLock is not your chosen security provider, website security is on your list of goals for 2014 as well. To get started on meeting this goal call SiteLock at 855.378.6200.

Google Author: Neal O’Farrell

SiteLock Website Security

Santa’s Reply to a Website Security Wish List

Dear Website,

Santa's reply to a security-concerned websiteWell, I’m not really sure where to begin. Not only was it the first time I’ve received a letter asking me for website security for Christmas, but also the very first letter I’ve ever received from a website. And trust me, I’ve been doing this for quite a while, long before that internet thingy I started for Al Gore.

I am very sorry to hear how worried you are about security, and especially hackers and malware. Not really for yourself, but for your owner. I know that most business owners are so busy building their dream, they sometimes forget that there are some very bad people out there who can too easily steal it all.

I have to admit, I wasn’t really sure where to start. If you’d asked me for a Kindle or an “i” something-or- other, or even just a toy or a scarf, that would be easy. But I feel a little like most business owners do, not really knowing how to protect you and even where to start.

But when I had some downtime on my sleigh (don’t worry – it has cruise control, so it was perfectly safe), I did some research and I hope you’ll be happy with what I came up with.

So here it goes:

You said you wanted someone to watch over you. Well, while I’d love to be able to do that, you understand I have my own full-time job, even in the off-season. So I sent your owner a very nice letter advising her that the best thing she could do for herself (and for you) was to sign up for SiteLock so that you aren’t so vulnerable to all those hackers and malware removal is automatic.

I love giving gifts like that. They’re not extravagant so there’s no need to feel guilty. They’re very simple to use, so your owner doesn’t have to spend her holidays pouring over an instruction manual or looking for batteries. And once you switch it on, SiteLock will guard you and your business around the clock, from the most advanced threats and determined hackers.

So what was next? Oh yes, better passwords. I hear that. It’s a nightmare for my toy business. Who knew so many employees, elves especially, are so careless with important passwords? Like FTP. I mean, why have a lock on the front door of your business if you insist on leaving the keys in it?

But I’ve got you covered. I sent every employee a password manager (don’t worry, some of the best are free). Now they can create and protect the most complex of passwords, and store them all in one safe place. So not being able to remember all those big and clumsy passwords is no excuse. And some of these programs will even remind you when it’s time to update your passwords, so forgetting is not an issue either.

Let me see, what else did you ask for? Sorry, my memory isn’t what it used to be. Oh yes, you wanted to get rid of all that outdated content and code on your website because you think it’s slowing you down. Tell me about. Every year about this time, when the rush dies down, we promise to tidy up the place so that we can run more efficiently as we prepare for next year.

And every year that resolution goes out the door as quick as Christmas itself. Not to worry. I created a special note just for your webmaster. In exchange for his list, I gave him a list, too. It’s pretty simple. I told him to go through every page of the site and remove any outdated content and images, and clean up or remove outdated code — we all know how dangerous that can be.

I also told him to get a patching and updating regimen in place so that all critical patches are installed as soon as they’re available, and outdated software and plugins don’t leave you vulnerable.

I think that’s it. Hope I’m not missing anything. When I think about it, I wish every website would send me a letter like this. I can easily find their owners and lean on them a little.

I mean, if this is the season of goodwill and joy, why shouldn’t it start with your website, the face of your business? For more information, just ask the experts at SiteLock. Give them a call at 855-378-6200. They’re available 24/7 to help.

 

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